Miller Claytor House

  • 2200 Miller Claytor Lane
  • Lynchburg, VA 24503

The Miller-Claytor House, erected in 1791 for tavern keeper John Miller, is Lynchburg’s only remaining 18th-century town house. Serving as an historic exhibit, the two-story frame building is an intriguing example of urban vernacular architecture. Thomas Jefferson allegedly proved to the owner of the house’s garden that tomatoes were not poisonous by eating the fruit. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and located in Riverside Park on Miller-Claytor Lane. Open by appointment with garden open to the public from dawn to dusk.

The Miller-Claytor House, erected in 1791 for tavern keeper John Miller, is Lynchburg’s only remaining 18th-century town house. Serving as an historic exhibit, the two-story frame building is an intriguing example of urban vernacular architecture. Thomas Jefferson allegedly proved to the owner of the house’s garden that tomatoes were not poisonous by eating the fruit. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and located in Riverside Park on Miller-Claytor Lane. Open by appointment with garden open to the public from dawn to dusk.

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