Civil War Trails

  • 216 12th Street
  • Lynchburg, VA 24504

Lynchburg is home to an impressive twelve sites on the Civil War Trails. Enjoy discovering Lynchburg as you follow these historic markers from downtown, to midtown and beyond. Sandusky 757 Sandusky Drive, Lynchburg VA 24502  434-832-0162  Road map  This 1808 Federal-style home was taken over by  Gen. David Hunter and used as Union headquarters during the Battle of Lynchburg. This was the base camp from which Union leaders plotted further strategies in their unsuccessful plans to burn Lynchburg. The Civil War Center on the grounds of Historic Sandusky offers exciting displays and an impressive surround-sound theater. Quaker Meeting House 5810 Fort Ave, Lynchburg VA 24502  Road map  Confederate cavalry watched the Federals advance toward Lynchburg from here, fighting a delaying action until Early moved into position. Fort Early Fort Ave and Memorial Ave, Lynchburg VA 24502  Road map  This is a series of earthen forts built in 1863. Early began moving troops into the line June 17, with Fort Early at the center, guarding the Lynchburg-Salem Turnpike. It was defended successfully June 18. Fort McCausland 2055 Langhorne Rd, Lynchburg VA 24501  Road map  Built earlier in 1864 to protect the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, the fort was used by Confederates defending the right flank during Hunter's attacks. The earthen wall still stand today. Old City Cemetery and Pest House 401 Taylor St, Lynchburg VA 24501 434-847-1465  Road map  This wonderfully restored cemetery, founded in 1806, includes a well-interpreted Confederate and Civil War section. There were 2,200 Confederate burials here. The Pest House Medical Museum offers a glimpse of 19th–century medical practices. The building was a quarantine building for Confederate soldiers. The Cemetery Center includes a museum featuring antique mourning items and a small gift shop. Civil War Lynchburg Ninth and Jefferson streets, Lynchburg 24504  Road map  This marker describes Lynchburg's role in the war, focusing on its critical role as a major transportation hub with 3 railroads, the James River and the Kanawha Canal. It also describes Lynchburg as a major supply center. Civil War Hospitals 12th Street and Dunbar Drive, Lynchburg VA 24504  Road map  Tour sign located near buildings which were used as Confederate hospitals during the war. Thirty-two hospitals treated 3,000–4,000 patients at a time, many more after major battles, making Lynchburg the second largest hospital center during the Civil War. Spring Hill Cemetery 3000 Fort Ave, Lynchburg VA 24501  Road map  Gen. Early moved troops into the cemetery during the battle to bolster his lines at the Salem Turnpike. Today, Confederate Gens. Thomas T. Munford, James Dearing and Jubal Early himself are buried here. The Lynchburg Museum at the Old Courthouse 901 Court St, Lynchburg VA 24504  Road map  Located in the 1855 Court House, the museum's displays describe the area’s history including much on the Civil War. Flags, artifacts from the 1864 Battle of Lynchburg, and items used by Gen. Jubal Early are on display. Point of Honor 112 Cabell St., Lynchburg VA 24504  Road map  Trails sign located at the house museum tells the story of its wartime resident, Col. Robert Owen, president of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. The home also may have been visited by Union spies before the 1864 Battle of Lynchburg. The 1815 Federal-style building is part of the Lynchburg Museum system. Packet Boat Marshall  Trails sign in Riverside Park off Rosemont Ave  Road map (park entrance)  The restored iron hull of the packet boat that brought the body of Stonewall Jackson from Lynchburg to Lexington is preserved here in a special structure. Jackson’s remains were shipped by train from Richmond to Lynchburg following his death in May 1863, then taken for burial to Lexington on this boat. Prisoner of War Camp - Corner of Memorial and Langhorne                                                                   This was the site of a Confederate training camp and Union prisoner-of-war camp during the Civil War. Lynchburg was an obvious choice for a prisoner-of-war camp because of its superior rail system and its remoteness from the front lines. No medical services were available, and many deaths occurred in the tent encampment.

Lynchburg is home to an impressive twelve sites on the Civil War Trails. Enjoy discovering Lynchburg as you follow these historic markers from downtown, to midtown and beyond. Sandusky 757 Sandusky Drive, Lynchburg VA 24502  434-832-0162  Road map  This 1808 Federal-style home was taken over by  Gen. David Hunter and used as Union headquarters during the Battle of Lynchburg. This was the base camp from which Union leaders plotted further strategies in their unsuccessful plans to burn Lynchburg. The Civil War Center on the grounds of Historic Sandusky offers exciting displays and an impressive surround-sound theater. Quaker Meeting House 5810 Fort Ave, Lynchburg VA 24502  Road map  Confederate cavalry watched the Federals advance toward Lynchburg from here, fighting a delaying action until Early moved into position. Fort Early Fort Ave and Memorial Ave, Lynchburg VA 24502  Road map  This is a series of earthen forts built in 1863. Early began moving troops into the line June 17, with Fort Early at the center, guarding the Lynchburg-Salem Turnpike. It was defended successfully June 18. Fort McCausland 2055 Langhorne Rd, Lynchburg VA 24501  Road map  Built earlier in 1864 to protect the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, the fort was used by Confederates defending the right flank during Hunter's attacks. The earthen wall still stand today. Old City Cemetery and Pest House 401 Taylor St, Lynchburg VA 24501 434-847-1465  Road map  This wonderfully restored cemetery, founded in 1806, includes a well-interpreted Confederate and Civil War section. There were 2,200 Confederate burials here. The Pest House Medical Museum offers a glimpse of 19th–century medical practices. The building was a quarantine building for Confederate soldiers. The Cemetery Center includes a museum featuring antique mourning items and a small gift shop. Civil War Lynchburg Ninth and Jefferson streets, Lynchburg 24504  Road map  This marker describes Lynchburg's role in the war, focusing on its critical role as a major transportation hub with 3 railroads, the James River and the Kanawha Canal. It also describes Lynchburg as a major supply center. Civil War Hospitals 12th Street and Dunbar Drive, Lynchburg VA 24504  Road map  Tour sign located near buildings which were used as Confederate hospitals during the war. Thirty-two hospitals treated 3,000–4,000 patients at a time, many more after major battles, making Lynchburg the second largest hospital center during the Civil War. Spring Hill Cemetery 3000 Fort Ave, Lynchburg VA 24501  Road map  Gen. Early moved troops into the cemetery during the battle to bolster his lines at the Salem Turnpike. Today, Confederate Gens. Thomas T. Munford, James Dearing and Jubal Early himself are buried here. The Lynchburg Museum at the Old Courthouse 901 Court St, Lynchburg VA 24504  Road map  Located in the 1855 Court House, the museum's displays describe the area’s history including much on the Civil War. Flags, artifacts from the 1864 Battle of Lynchburg, and items used by Gen. Jubal Early are on display. Point of Honor 112 Cabell St., Lynchburg VA 24504  Road map  Trails sign located at the house museum tells the story of its wartime resident, Col. Robert Owen, president of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. The home also may have been visited by Union spies before the 1864 Battle of Lynchburg. The 1815 Federal-style building is part of the Lynchburg Museum system. Packet Boat Marshall  Trails sign in Riverside Park off Rosemont Ave  Road map (park entrance)  The restored iron hull of the packet boat that brought the body of Stonewall Jackson from Lynchburg to Lexington is preserved here in a special structure. Jackson’s remains were shipped by train from Richmond to Lynchburg following his death in May 1863, then taken for burial to Lexington on this boat. Prisoner of War Camp - Corner of Memorial and Langhorne                                                                   This was the site of a Confederate training camp and Union prisoner-of-war camp during the Civil War. Lynchburg was an obvious choice for a prisoner-of-war camp because of its superior rail system and its remoteness from the front lines. No medical services were available, and many deaths occurred in the tent encampment.

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